DENVER – January 2, 2023

On December 21, 2022, Colorado experienced a weather record, a temperature drop of 37° in 1 hour!

The cold snap was a shock for Colorado residents, but more so for plants and trees. A quick extreme temperature change, like the one felt last month, can have a lasting effect on trees and plants.

Our in-house arborist, Tony Hahn spoke with 9News explaining, “Trees can’t prepare that quickly. Trees can make a type of anti-freeze to protect themselves, but it takes time.” He continued, “We are going to see a lot of trees damaged or die, those most vulnerable are old and sick trees and those that have been neglected.”

Landscape professionals don’t expect to fully understand the impact the cold temperatures had on the trees until this Spring. Look for black, shriveled shoots or buds, a sign of damage from the cold temperatures. If your trees are experiencing any of these signs, you should call a landscape expert. If the tree(s) need to be removed, consider replacing them with a native and cold-tolerant species such as Hackberry, Bur Oak, White Oak, Swamp White Oak, Augustine American Elm, Bosnian Pine, Pinion Pine, or Cedar trees. However, you should consult an arborist before selecting a replacement tree. One of the biggest mistakes property owners make with landscaping is having the wrong tree planted in the wrong location on their property. Arborists understand a tree’s potential grow height and width, possible insect and disease issues, fruit and flower-producing capabilities, maintenance requirements, hardiness, sun exposure needs, and more, which all play a factor in planting the right tree in the right place.

Due to the structure of Evergreen trees, they should survive the frigid temperatures. The cold weather may have even helped combat the bark beetles that have been attacking spruce trees in Colorado.

Watch the video

For more tips from our team of certified arboriculturists, contact us at
info@denvercps.com